Monday, June 7, 2010

Ready To Win Over Depression Blog Tour With Thelma Wells

Welcome to by blog tour interview with Thelma Wells. Depression is very near and dear to my heart. I have suffered with depression and I know how important it is for women to understand about this illness. I'm so glad you stopped by.

THELMA: Before I begin, let me first say, if you and/or a loved one are in a crisis situation and you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book.
In your introduction, you state that you’ve been there – you’ve been depressed. Tell us about that.
Yes, I have. This story is told in detail in the book, however, I had surgery several years ago and within a few days the incision split open and my intestines were exposed. This was probably by far the worst pain I’ve ever experienced. After a quick trip back to the hospital to repair the damage, I spent over a year bed-ridden, disabled, and recovering. I’m not the kind of person to lie down and take things slow, especially when it’s forced on me. Yet, in this situation I had no choice but to stop and heal. It wasn’t easy and I faced a lot of fears and I experienced situational depressed during this time.

How do you define depression?
Some of us are more prone to depression than others. The influences that bring us down in our spirits can come from many sources and directions. Depression can be a complex picture. But let’s face it. The main reason we get despondent is simply because life happens. And nobody’s life is a constant procession of uplifting, rejuvenating, invigorating experiences. Everybody’s life has downers. We easily get off-balance in so many ways, and this hurts. The TV commercial that says, “Depression hurts” is true.

Does your book focus on one type of depression?
For most of us, the depression we typically encounter isn’t the severe or clinical category, medically speaking. The typical depression is situational. This doesn’t mean they’re painless or less important or harmless.
Dr. Archibald D. Hart, a leading Christian psychologist and dean emeritus of the School of Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary writes, “While these depressions are not usually as serious as the biological ones, they can be much more difficult to cope with.”

In your first Chapter, you talk about “Who get’s depressed?” Does depression affect certain groups of people more than others?
Every year depression strikes more than 35 million in the United States alone. We’re seeing depression with frightening regularity in ourselves, our relatives, and our friends. Dr. Harts states, “There is hardly a family today that is not touched by depression’s tentacles.” Depression affects people of all social classes, all races, and all cultures, but there’s one group that’s especially hard hit…women. Also there is an alarming increase in children and the elderly.
What are the triggers and causes of depression?
Psychology Information Online, which includes content provided by the National Institute on Mental Health, notes that “a depressive episode” can be triggered by “a serious loss, chronic illness, relationship problems, work stress, family crisis, financial setback, or any unwelcome life change.” Sometimes depression is brought on by an underlying disease or biochemical disorder. Whatever the cause of our depression, it needs to be faced and understood realistically—and then accepted for what it truly is.

Does the Bible speak about depression?
It does in several places and we see it in the lives of David, Jeremiah, and Paul. Psalms 42 and 43 together represent the cry of a downcast soul—someone who is hurting and thirsting for God. Paul describes our loving Father as “God, who comforts the downcast” (2 Corinthians 7:6).
Christians do get depressed, but it’s a temporary state. God allows us to experience it as a means to attaining something better. Our hope and contentment are based on seeing our past and present difficulties as gifts from God to prepare us and enable us to do more for Him by sharing Christ, finding delight in God and what He ordains.

What are the steps you outline for “Doing something about it.” And why are these important?
• Get It All Out – talk to somebody about how you’re feeling. Emotionally and mentally, talking about your feelings is a healthy thing to do. Everybody needs somebody to confide in. That’s right. Everybody.
• Take Care of Yourself Physically – How healthy we are physically always impacts our mental, emotional, and spiritual health.
• Don’t be Deceived – Your emotions can fool you into questioning or not knowing what’s real or not real. Depression can cause some strange symptoms.
• You’re Your Own Captive Audience – People talk to themselves. We all do it. When we talk to ourselves, we need to watch what we’re saying. You see, when we talk to ourselves, we invoke our consciousness. And in our conscious awareness, we truly hear what we say. Our subconscious hearts it—and believes it! Then our creative self-conscious gets busy working it out…whether or not it’s true, real, positive, negative, or healthy.
Hope is a key word used throughout the book, but especially in the last chapter.

What does the mystery of hope mean?
“Hope deferred makes the heart sick...” (Proverbs 13:12). Hope and prayer always go together. In fact, prayer is the voice of hope. When there’s hopelessness, prayer dries up and blows ways. Real hope is huge! To have a biblical hope found in Ephesians 4:1-16 is to possess “living hope.”
From page 99 to page 109, I discuss the facets of hope that we can attain when we refocus our attention from us to God. Our living hope is not in things, people’s opinions, positions, status, or any tangible findings of life. No, it rests upon the spiritual and emotional stability of our minds on the only wise God, our Father, who can help us in our depressed states every day. This living hope is in Jesus, the Anointed One, whose job it is to redeem us for all things that oppress us. The only hope for the world is Jesus. The only help for the world is a touch from God.

You spend a whole chapter on “Looking Outward.” Why is this important?
At the risk of bursting someone’s bubble…the world doesn’t revolve around you. I know you might have thought it did. I used to think the same thing about me. One of the best ways to deal with depression is to do something for somebody without expecting anything in return.
Search for a volunteer organization, mentor a child or young person, or find someone who needs help with something and help them. Do something. That’s the key.
I have several activities available via my ministry that offer opportunities to people to connect with others. Join me on excursions across the country and to Israel studying the Word, relaxing, rejuvenating and enjoying the life God has given us. We are also launching the Ready to Win Web Cast University with a variety of experts to offer you the best in Christian instruction, study, and education. I have hand selected several outstanding speakers that will enable you to be READY TO WIN in every situation. Both of these and more are available on my web site at www.ThelmaWells.com.

How is the book different from others?
This book is different from others because it gives the reader a non-threatening opportunity to ask themselves questions and answer those questions in the book as they are reading it. It is not a course of study; it is a means of helping them “get it out.” It allows them to analyze their state of being and work through it alone so that it is there personal and confidential analysis and directives for healing.

What results do you see that can come from reading this book?
The results I see from reading this book are:
• People have a handy reference at their fingertips for calling their attention to what they are facing in terms of situational depression.
• People have at their fingertips information that they can share with others who may be experienced the same kind of depression.
• There are reminders in the book that are encouraging and inspiring that can be used as a devotional.
• There are stories that people can relate to and realize that they are not alone and there is always help.
How do you see individuals, small groups and even churches using this book?
Not only is the book appropriate for individuals, it is designed for group work for small and large study sessions. Because it is a simple lay-out and intentionally open-ended, it can be used as a guide for therapists with their clients, ladies groups of any kind, church groups, Sunday School classes, Bible studies, or references for children’s groups that are concerned about situational depression in our children.

Where can we connect with you further on this topic? Or, purchase a copy of this book?
I would love for them to visit my web site at www.ThelmaWells.com, browse through the various events and other resources available, as well as sign up for my mailing list.

READY TO WIN OVER DEPRESSION is also available online and at local bookstores such as, Family Christian Stores, Lifeway Christian Stores, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble Book Stores, Mardel’s, Anchor Distributors, Christianbook.com, and many other stores and vendors throughout American and the United Kingdom.

I would also like to connect with people on the new Facebook page we set up specifically for this topic at www.facebook.com/readytowinoverdepression. Or they can find me on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/Thelmaw.

Again, let me say…if you or someone you know is dealing with depression, you are not crazy. God knows you’re not crazy. And He also has a perfect antidote for your depression. Nothing escapes Him, and he knows you far better than you know yourself. Isn’t that a relief and comfort?

A complimentary copy of this book was provided to me as a blog tour host by the author in exchange for posting this interview on my blog. Please visit Christian Speaker Services at www.ChristianSpeakerServices.com for more information about blog tour management services.

9 comments:

Bethany from Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom said...

Pick me, pick me!! I don't want to struggle with depression, so I pretend I'm not. And I hate talking about how I feel because that makes me more vulnerable. I had a big, bad depressive episode about 6 years ago and did get help, but I don't want it to be back! Sounds like I need to read this book.

Denise said...

Reading this interview gave me tears in my eyes. February 19, 2008 my husband tried to commit suicide. Last year he started have dizzy spells and ended up hospitalized with them in July. Found out they were seizures. The day he was supposed to come home the doctor wanted him to talk to a psychiatrist. He did not come home. He spent two months in the hospital. Diagnosed with PTSD. In the meantime I'm working, taking care of the house, kids, etc., etc. Luckily I have two wonderful kids who are teenagers. I had gotten to the point where I physcially, mentally and emotionally could barely function. There was stuff I needed to do but just wasn't able. On top of all this stuff I lost my dad in March 2007 and my mom in June of 2008. My mom had a heart attack in March 2008 but because of the stuff I was going through with my husband she didn't want me to know.

Throughout the past year there have been times that I have just wanted to give up. That I feel I can't do it any more. But somehow somewhere God has always given me the strength to continue.

Carol Taylor said...

Sounds like a great book! Everyone suffers from depression or knows someone who does/has. After my breast cancer diagnosis I could "feel it coming on" as they say, and sought help.

Do you think this would be a good book for my Stephen Ministry group to read together and discuss? Many of those we help suffer from depression. It probably would be a great resource!

Tanya Glanzman said...

After a childhood of extreme neglect and abuse, depression had been a part of my life ever since I was a child. I struggled through my teen years and with several suicide attempts and hospitilizations. I was on three different medications throughout that time- each "helping" but really only serving as a band aid to help deal with the real issues- THE LORD SET ME FREE bit by bit however as I walked with him on a journey of healing taking each of my inner wounds to Him allowing Him to make me WHOLE one step at a time. It was a painful process but worth it- He broke the chains of depression that had me bound and has now called me to help bind up the broken-hearted....

Kim Kaberle said...

Bethany,
I am so glad you sought help years ago. Many women today and men especially won't seek help with depression. Sometimes medication is necessary and sometimes counseling or talking with a friend. Regardless we need to seek Jesus daily. He is the great counselor. And Bethany ,don't be afraid to talk about your feelings. Thanks for sharing!

Kim Kaberle said...

Carol, I think Thelma's book could be used alone or with a group. There are questions at the end of each chapter for reflection. It would also make a nice resource book for those in Stephens Ministry. There is such a need for this caring ministry.

Kim Kaberle said...

Tanya, you are a testimony to how God can heal us from depression. Many times we forget about God in the process and he is the ultimate healer and comforter.

Kim Avery said...

Hi Kim,

Thanks so much for posting this interview. As a therapist I've seen the devastation of depression more times than I can count and it breaks my heart.

Praise the Lord that He provides help and support through people like you and Thelma.

Keep doing what you are doing!

kim Kaberle said...

The blog tour is over. The free book giveaway goes to "Denise." Please send your address to my email: kim@womendivinelydesigned.com

Thanks to everyone who left a comment.

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Quotes

"Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths" Prov. 3:5-6